Learning Environment

1. Description and Scope

Learning Environment includes capabilities that support a learning organization, including organizational learning, group learning, individual learning, situational learning, lifelong learning, learning in virtual environments, instructional design, and problem solving methodologies.


2. Value of Competency to Knowledge Roles

This competency area is important to all knowledge professionals, but particularly to those in a Chief Knowledge Officer role, and to Knowledge Managers who also have learning and training responsibilities. This competency is also of value to educators who are looking for new learning models, and to professionals involved in instructional design.


3. Proposed Courses for Competency Area

There are currently no courses in the IAKM curriculum that address this competency. The courses suggested for this competency are listed below. Like other competencies, a mix of traditional courses (3 credits), masters or short courses (2 credits), and workshops (1 credit) are recommended. They are presented in the order they might be offered in the course catalog. Each course also has a potential source or provider, identified in parentheses.

When all proposed courses are available, students would have one 3-credit course to chose from in both the Fall Semester and the Spring Semester. In addition, they would have three 1-credit courses and one 2-credit course throughout the year. Of all the competencies proposed, this is probably the least well supported.


Course
Type of Course
Semester
Offered

Learning Organizations and Learning Environment Management
3-credit
Fall
Critical Thinking Skills
1-credit
Fall
Principles of Instructional Design
3-credit
Spring
Learning in Virtual Environments
1-credit
Spring
Problem Detection and Solving Methods
1-credit
Spring
Lifelong Learning Models
2-credit
Summer

4. Recommended Course Development Strategies and Schedule

This competency will evolve much like the Culture and Communication competency. Developing courses in this competency means going directly to the experts such as the instructors and graduate students associated with the Society for Organizational Learning at MIT. It also provides an opportunity to work closely with the individual schools within the College of Communication and Information - specifically with Journalism and Mass Media, and Communication Studies.

Course development here would not begin until 2011-12, unless there is an opportunity to collaborate with an education system or school. Such an opportunity could be suggested as a result of this renewal discussion, in which case we would reconsider the courses and the delivery schedule.


Course
Year
Developed

Learning Organizations and Learning Environment Management
2011-12
Problem Detection and Solving Methods
2011-12
Principles of Instructional Design
2012-13
Lifelong Learning Models
2012-13
Learning in Virtual Environments
2012-13

This is a competency where either asynchronous or synchronous delivery would work. Synchronous delivery would enable us to move forward more quickly absent upfront development funding for new courses. Synchronous delivery could be used to capture and package course content for asynchronous delivery.

By Academic Year 2012/13 we would have deployed all of these courses, with the bulk of the effort coming in Academic Year 2012/13.


New Courses Added
Academic Year 2010-11

New Courses Added
Academic Year 2011-12

New Courses Added
Academic Year 2012-13

Total Courses 2013-2014
3 credit = 0
2 credit = 0
1 credit 0

3 credit =1
2 credit =0
1 credit =0

3 credit =1
2 credit =1
1 credit =2

3 credit =2
2 credit =1
1 credit =2


5. Funding Opportunities for Course Development

We are investigating partnerships and revenue streams targeted at this competency area. The challenge we face here is the economic status of some of the major partners, such as public education systems or schools of education. We will explore grant and research funding opportunities through the U.S. Department of Education, the Ohio Department of Economic Development, the National Science Foundation, and private sources such as the Knight and Gates Foundations.

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